Memories of the Dubai Desert

Dubai desert

Dubai desert

Dubai desert

Dubai Desert

Dubai desert

to be a kid again!

Dubai desert

Dubai desert

Posted in Day-to-day living in Dubai | Tagged , , , , , , | 15 Comments

Sending Hearts on Valentine’s Day

I stole borrowed this idea from the creative Terri and James at Gallivance. Check out their blog for their awesome post, “Capturing Hearts around the World.”  When I saw their pics, I immediately thought of my picture of a baby blue door in Oman. I started wondering if I had any other “heart” pics from my travels. Obsessing over pictures the way I do, I couldn’t resist going on a scavenger hunt for hearts in my photo archives. Here are the few I found.  And if you’d like to make some chocolate hearts today instead of looking at pictures of them, check out my sister’s recipe for her delicious Cioccolatini. Happy Valentine’s Day everyone!

Muscat

Muscat

wall of love near the Romeo and Juliet balcony in Verona

wall of love near the Romeo and Juliet balcony in Verona

detail of the carpet I bought in Dubai

detail of the carpet I bought in Dubai

National Day pride in Hatta

National Day pride in Hatta

cappuccinos in Milan

cappuccino in Milan

Sharjah

Sharjah

bakery in Houston

bakery in Houston

Dubai - somewhere near the souks

Dubai – somewhere near the souks

Dubai - Jumeirah 1

Dubai – Jumeirah 1

another door in Jumeirah 1

another door in Jumeirah 1

Dubai - near the Jumeirah Mosque

Dubai – near the Jumeirah Mosque

detail of the front gate of my house in Dubai

detail of the front gate of my house in Dubai

beautiful bread in Vienna

beautiful bread in Vienna

Gold Souk - Dubai

Gold Souk – Dubai

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Dubai’s Skyscrapers: A Photo Tour

Dubai skyscrapers

When you think of Dubai’s skyscrapers, maybe you think of one of these:

 

Dubai is full of other interesting buildings that don’t get much recognition. I had planned to spend a day with my camera taking pictures of some of the pretty buildings downtown. (To see buildings in the Marina, click here.) Well, time ran out so instead I snapped these on my last few days with my mobile phone as I was running errands. Maybe it’s not the most representative collection, but it’s my last-ditch effort to remember what Dubai looked like in 2014, as it’s sure to look very different, very soon, with all the construction that’s going on.

The Dusit Thani hotel:

The Address hotel:

Dubai International Financial Centre

DIFC

 

Emirates Towers

dubai skyscrapers 3

skyscrapers Dubai 8

 

dubai skyscrapers 1DSC_0535Dubai skyscrapers 9

 

 

metro on Sheikh Zayed Road

I once read that 25% of all the world’s cranes were in Dubai. Then I read that was just an urban myth. True or not, there does seem to be a LOT of cranes around!

Dubai construction 6

One thing I liked about Dubai when we first arrived was the clear view of the skyline on Sheikh Zayed Road from lots of places on Al Wasl Road and Jumeirah Beach Road. These views are disappearing as more and more shopping malls and development are planned for the area.

dubai construction 1 Dubai construction 8

Future home of the Dubai Opera House:

Dubai construction 7

I wanted to take a pictures of these guys while they were working, but they wanted to pose. After I snapped this, their boss came over and asked what I was doing. I suddenly felt a little afraid. “Ummm, just documenting the growth of Dubai, sir.” He smiled and said he wanted to make sure nothing was wrong.  That made me feel like something must be wrong. Or maybe he was just annoyed that I was distracting the workers.

The heat index was around 125F (51C) when I took this. Just standing outside for a few minutes to take these photos was extremely uncomfortable, so I can’t imagine what it would be like to dig ditches or lift heavy machinery. These guys are amazing.

Here are just a handful of the countless workers who are turning a sleepy fishing village into a cosmopolitan city attracting millions of visitors ever year.

Dubai construction 5 Dubai construction 4

 

Dubai construction 2 Dubai construction 3

 

Dubai construction

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Dubai’s Fish Market

Slimy fish. Sharks with eyes popping out of their heads. A stench that caused my kids to plug their noses and lingered on our clothes after even a short visit. Why on earth did I like the fish souk so much? I guess it’s because it was authentic. And a bit rough around the edges. And full of interesting things and people to look at.  I hear they are going to build a new one, and that makes me really sad.  This one has been in use since 1988, which may not sound like much, but when a country is only 43 years old, that makes this fish souk a historic landmark! I posted some pictures a long time ago, but here are a few more from more recent visits. I miss this place even though the thought of stinking dead fish isn’t exactly the first thing that comes to mind when I think of nostalgia. :)

A few tips: As you can see from the pics, even though it’s known as the fish souq or market, the area also includes a fruit and veggie market with beautiful produce, nuts and dried fruits, dates and a butcher. It closes mid-day, so schedule your visit for morning time or in the evening. For a great deal, try to time your visit right before it closes, but be prepared to be bombarded by fish sellers trying to offload the last of their catch. (This happened to me once when I had four kids in tow – the children were actually a bit frightened because we became surrounded by shouting vendors!) Taking photos and bringing children tend to attract a lot of attention from the vendors. They generally are very friendly and enjoy showing off their biggest or bloodiest catch, but at times it can be overwhelming for small and/or shy children. Lastly, sharpen up your bargaining skills – you’ll need them when negotiating the price. Click here for a map of the location.

dubai fish market vegetable stalls

 

dubai fish market veggies

 

dubai fish market fish 1

dubai fish market fish 6

 

dubai fish market workers 5

dubai fish market workers 4

 

dubai fish market crabs

 

dubai fish market fish 7

 

dubai fish market workers 1

 

dubai fish market workers 2

dubai fish market fish 5dubai fish market workers 3I had been to the fish souk many times, but our last visit was the first time I saw these sharks. I have to say it was a really, really ugly scene!

dubai fish market sharks 4

dubai fish market sharks 2

 

dubai fish market sharks 1

 

dubai fish market sharks 3

I prefer to hang out by the nuts and dates. :)

dubai fish market nuts

dubai fish market dates

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Istanbul, 2 shots of whisky and 1 crazy taxi driver

As soon as the passenger next to me on our flight from Dubai to Istanbul popped open his big bottle of whisky he had just bought in duty-free, I knew the trip would be interesting and unpredictable. Johanna and I had bought a small bottle of wine from the flight attendant to celebrate the beginning of our adventure. Our new friend in 10C suggested we join him in drinking whisky. “I already have wine,” I explained, “but thank you!”

“No, really, have some, it’s okay – just add it to your glass,” he insisted. Before we could protest, my friend and I found ourselves drinking red wine mixed with whisky. An interesting concoction, but not really one I’m dying to try again – ha! After straight whisky following the wine/whisky mix, we had to decline the third offer, but still shared pictures of children and grandchildren. We offered him some nuts Johanna had brought along. He liked them so much he ate the whole bag! He munched on them while loudly chatting with friends or family who were a few rows in front of us. What a character.

With warm and rosy cheeks, we gathered our bags and grabbed a taxi.  This was hands down the craziest taxi ride I have ever taken. Yes, even crazier than any Dubai taxi ride and for those who live in Dubai – you know that says a lot. In hindsight, the blue neon strip light shining through the back window and blaring Turkish techno music should have been clues that something was awry. How to explain this trip? Mario Andretti comes to mind.  Yes, driving with Mario Andretti for a solid hour through congested traffic. It’s funny now, but it was terrifying at the time. Convinced an accident was imminent, I thought of my children and how selfish I was to take this trip. I asked him to slow down twice, but that didn’t stop him from swerving, tailgating, cutting across four lanes of traffic to catch an exit at the last-minute, and driving 160 km/hr (that’s 100 mph – no exaggeration!), all while calmly pointing out landmarks along the way instead of looking at the road. It went on for so long I started wondering if we were part of a Turkish practical joke show.

Luckily we arrived safely. We asked him why he was driving so fast, and he said he used to be an ambulance driver.  Huh? I’m not sure if he was joking or not, but one perk was that we arrived at the hotel relatively quickly given the traffic and how far it was from the airport. The man who checked us in saw that I was from Texas on my passport and said he had an internship there for a bit and talked about how much he loved Austin. Such a coincidence!  This was just the beginning of a really fun and funny weekend. More pictures of Istanbul follow. This is my last post of 2014. Happy New Year everyone!

View of Istanbul from Bosphorus

Three of the major Istanbul landmarks: the Blue Mosque, Hagia Sofia, and Topkapi Palace, as seen from a boat ride at sunset.

istanbul buildings

exterior Hagia Sophia

exterior Hagia Sophia

interior of Hagia Sophia

interior of Hagia Sophia

Doors leading into Hagia Sophia

Doors leading into Hagia Sophia

making textiles

making textiles

Tram in Beyoglu

Tram in Beyoglu

Taksim Square - site of the recent protests where Turkish police used water cannons and tear gas to clear thousands of protesters. Thousands were injured and 11 people died.

Taksim Square – site of the recent protests where Turkish police used water cannons and tear gas to clear thousands of protesters. Thousands were injured and 11 people died. In some ways it’s hard to imagine that the photos from the protests that look like they were taken in a war zone were shot here. On the other hand, the police are clear about making their presence known with big armored trucks that are more military than police parked on the streets as a reminder to all.

exterior of Topkapi Palace

exterior of Topkapi Palace

an interior shot of Topkapi Palace

an interior shot of Topkapi Palace

Views from Topkapi Palace:

view from topkapi palace 2 view from topkapi palace

giant shawarma!

That is one giant shawarma!

exterior Blue Mosque

exterior Blue Mosque

interior Blue Mosque

interior Blue Mosque

interior of Blue Mosque

interior of Blue Mosque

square near Blue Mosque

square near Blue Mosque

Check out all those bars of chocolate!

Check out all those bars of chocolate!

Pics of and from Galata Bridge:

galata bridge istanbul

galata bridge istanbul 2

fishermen istanbul

Grand Bazaar - unfortunately we lasted about 2 minutes - too many people and too much stuff!

A bad picture of the Grand Bazaar (although I like the flag!) Unfortunately we lasted about 2 minutes – too many people and too much stuff!

for sale in Grand Bazaar

for sale in Grand Bazaar

bread maker istanbul

istanbul street 2

inside the Spice Bazaar

inside the Spice Bazaar

spice bazaar istanbl

so many pretty mosques

so many pretty mosques

New Mosque Istanbul

mosque at sunset

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Istanbul – It’s All in the Details

News of a transatlantic move. Three weeks until blast off.  Husband suggests trip so no regrets later. To-do list with pressing matters examined. Guilt ensues. Friend agrees to go. Tickets booked. To-do list thrown out window for three days.  Istanbul… here we come.

That was the extent of my disjointed thought process before going to Istanbul. With very little time left on my Dubai watch, I squeezed this one in, barely.

When I think of Istanbul, I think of the rise and fall of powerful empires.  I think of sweeping views and majestic landmarks.  I think of Europe and Asia meeting in one place – each staking its claim and imposing its culture on the people of the city.  Larger than life. So when I came home to look at my pictures, I was really surprised by how many I had of little details. It’s the kind of city where you can spend a lot of time on countless rooftop cafes and restaurants, marveling at the rich history of the city below and wondering about the future of the 14 million people who call Istanbul home. But while walking around on the streets, it’s easy to lose sight of the bigger picture and become mesmerized by the beautiful little details that surround you.  Another less romantic theory is that I didn’t have three children tagging along distracting me and could actually notice a pretty faucet. :)

Here are some of those little pretty touches and quiet moments I found in grand and chaotic Istanbul.

 

turkish coffee and turkish delight

Turkish coffee and Turkish delight. Yum.

A detail of ceiling in Hagia Sophia

A detail of ceiling in Hagia Sophia

Detail of pillars in Hagia Sophia

Detail of pillars in Hagia Sophia

 

turkish soap

soap for sale

street sign Beyoglu

Street sign in Beyoglu neighborhood

Topkapi Palace

Topkapi Palace

door topkapi palace

Door Topkapi Palace

tile Topkapi Palace

tile Topkapi Palace

Harem, Topkapi Palace

Harem, Topkapi Palace

Topkapi Palace

Topkapi Palace

Topkapi palace

Topkapi palace

DSC_0108-2

door Blue Mosque

door Blue Mosque

black and white istanbul

DSC_0028-2 DSC_0025-2 DSC_1085-2

faucet near Blue Mosque

faucet near Blue Mosque

 

carpet and tea Istanbul

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Sanctioned Graffiti in Dubai

There is a scene in Mad Men from season 2 where the family is enjoying a picnic on a sunny afternoon. Before leaving the area, Don chucks his empty beer can far afield and Betty shakes the trash off her blanket into the grass and then saunters off to the car.  I often thought of this scene in Dubai because this sort of careless littering is common. Earlier this year I went to a movie night at my sons’ school where everyone enjoyed (non-pork) hot dogs, popcorn and drinks on their picnic blankets while watching the film.  I was shocked by the amount of garbage left on the field after the movie. It was as if there were 100 Bettys from the 1960s! I was embarrassed for us all. Maybe the world-famous* “Don’t Mess with Texas” anti-litter campaign has made me extra sensitive, but I find littering like that appalling! I’ve even seen people throw an entire bag of fast food trash or their drink out the window of a car while driving. I’m not sure why people think it’s okay to leave trash around, but there are certainly plenty of workers available to clean it all up. The malls, airport, cars and metro are gleaming in ways most people wouldn’t think possible. This city is obsessed with cleaning, as long as someone else can be paid to do it.

Given the interest in portraying a spotless presentation to the public, not to mention its non-democratic government, it’s not surprising that painting graffiti would be punished harshly – fines or jail time. Graffiti as a Westerner might know it is uncommon. A few words or short phrases might be spray painted here and there in the older neighborhoods, but generally in black only with minimal artistic flair. Sometimes stencils are used for quick application. Of course, it’s usually removed very quickly.

However, sanctioned graffiti, essentially the antithesis of the graffiti of hip hop culture in the U.S., seems to be growing in popularity. Graffiti artists are hired by big corporations, commissioned to create works on public spaces, and courted by galleries. Despite its controlled messaging, I still enjoy seeing it.  Here are a few examples.

dubai wall art graffiti

This shot is the beginning of a mural along Jumeirah Beach Road commemorating Dubai’s win of the bid for the World Expo 2020.   The circular stars featured here are part of the logo of the expo. The hands with three fingers are a tribute to the leader of Dubai’s well-known three finger salute. Sheikh Mohammed uses the famous gesture in moments of victory. His website says, “It stands for three words; each word is composed of three letters from the Arabic alphabet that symbolize triumph, victory, and Arab origin.” Other sources say Sheikh Mohammed said they mean “win, triumph and excellence”, or “I love you,” or “victory, triumph and love.”

Sheikh Mohammed three fingered salute

picture credit: yahoo maktoob sports

Dubai wall art graffiti

Dubai graffiti

Falconry is a highly respected sport in the UAE and the power and beauty of the bird is revered. A leather hood is used to cover the falcon’s eyes to keep it calm, especially during training.

Dubai wall art graffiti

DSC_0319

Sheikh Mohammed uses this phrase in some of his speeches.

 

Dubai wall art graffiti

Major elements of Emirati culture are presented here: the oryx (a species of antelope native to the Arabian Peninsula), the Arabian coffee pot and wind tower. “Connecting minds, creating the future” was the expo bid theme.

 

Dubai wall art graffiti

The pen represents the importance of calligraphy in Arabic culture. Calligraphy is a highly valued art form and is often used in mosques because pictorial representation of people is forbidden.

Dubai wall art graffiti

Sheikh Mohammed has a passion for horses and horse racing.

 

The following photos are from a newer installation further down Jumeirah Beach Road near December 2nd street and the giant flag pole. The flag pole often serves as a landmark when giving directions, but its importance lies in the fact that it marks the spot where the leaders from the emirates signed the declaration establishing the UAE as a country. A museum is now being built in the area. Not so much graffiti as wall art (on a temporary wall) it includes more scenes of patriotism and local culture, highlighting the importance of the area.

Dubai wall art graffiti

The UAE flag here is comprised of the first verses of the national anthem, written in Arabic calligraphy.

Dubai wall art graffiti

Dubai wall art graffiti

Dubai wall art graffiti

The following piece was outside of an Alserkal Avenue gallery.

Alerskal Avenue grafitti

 

*I said “world famous” because I was so surprised when on a recent visit to Istanbul, I met a carpet salesman who asked where I was from, as they all do. When I said Texas, his first response was, “Don’t mess with Texas!” Whoever incorporated Texan bravado into this anti-litter campaign was a genius! Even Turks thousands of miles away know it!

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Comparisons

Tomorrow marks week two of our repatriation. Since we had just made a 6 week visit over the summer and are still not settled in what will be our permanent housing, it feels a lot like summer vacation.  Even though we’ve bought a car, are about to buy another, have been house hunting and started the kids in school, somehow it still feels temporary and I often find myself instinctively dreading the flight “back home” until I remember we bought a one way ticket to IAH.

Ever since we’ve come back, I can’t stop myself from making comparisons between Houston and Dubai. Surely this must be tiring for friends and family. I feel like an unjust parent constantly comparing the strengths and weaknesses of my children, making other people cringe.

Sometimes I miss Dubai, like when I went school supply shopping. I didn’t have to buy supplies in Dubai.  I breezed into school the first day with only lunch and uniforms to worry about. How spoiled! I should have remembered my sister’s tales of time-consuming shopping experiences; instead, I waited until 9 pm the night before the kids started school. I thought, “It’ll just be a quick run to the store to grab some construction paper. I’ll be back in an hour.” It wasn’t until I was standing in the greatly disheveled school supply aisle that had been moved to a small corner to make room for mountains of Halloween gear that I took out the list only to find things like this:

Zaner-Bloser Grade 3 Spiral Composition Book w/ Whale Cover

HUH?

Mead/Hytone Grade 1-2-3 Handwriting Tablet 1/2″ Ruled, 1/4″ Dotted Midline, Red Base Line, 40 ct 11×8.5 Horizontal

WHAT THE…?! What happened to just picking up some crayons and a box of Kleenex to contribute to the classroom stash?

I didn’t get to bed until 1 am that night after trying to complete my grade 1 and 2 scavenger hunt at three different stores.  I didn’t even get to go home with the satisfaction that I had crossed everything off the list. I admit I got mildly sidetracked by the Halloween items. When I wasn’t living here, the Dubai holiday goodies seemed disappointing because they were always more expensive and in shorter supply. Not to mention the price of pumpkins….  that was enough to make anyone weep.

Dubai pumpkin

Behold the $45 USD pumpkin in Dubai. I now pay $4.

But now that I’m back to living in Houston, the explosion of Halloween items makes my head swim in the sheer volume of unnecessary gluttony. I was in pursuit of some Fiskars 5″ blunt-tipped scissors when I happened to come across this never-ending aisle of candy. I stood and stared in disbelief for a bit. “Monstrously big” is right!

halloween candy 2

Imagine my surprise when I went to the very next aisle and saw this!

halloween candy 4

Then this!

halloween candy 5

Then this, this and this!

This is only the candy. Imagine the costumes, the decorations, the party supplies.  Ugh. This is too much. It made me miss the few little Halloween items in Dubai and simplicity of my old grocery store.

But then I drove to school the next morning and couldn’t be happier to be back in Houston. At the moment I’m driving from the suburbs to downtown, a drive that would make most people squirm with dread, but I was loving every minute. I never used my horn. Everyone stayed in their lane. I wasn’t clutching my wheel with white-knuckled tension. I didn’t blurt out any curse words. I parked across the street from the school instead of blocks away.  A cross-guard smiled and stopped traffic to let me and my children cross the street. I didn’t melt into a puddle of sweat while doing so. Sand didn’t blow in my face. I didn’t have to dash across the street with heart-pounding adrenaline hoping me and my children could outrun the speeding, red-light-running cars.  In the hallways there were lots of moms like me struggling with younger siblings. (At the Dubai school, this was rare because so many people left their babies at home with their nanny.) I left the campus immediately instead of inching away through bumper-to-bumper traffic. I didn’t drive home annoyed and lost in contemplation about the sense of entitlement people must have to think their time is more important than mine, not to mention the safety of children, when they cut in line, block intersections, tailgate and speed on campus.

Deep breath… it feels good to be home.

For an entertaining, well-written (and oh-so-true!) take on driving on Sheikh Zayed Road in Dubai, the road I took to and from school every day, read this post: The Little Things I Miss about Dubai, part 1 on Love Language Love Literature and thanks to Joan Frankham for re-blogging it so that I could discover it.

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Goodbye Dubai

20140921-210340-75820113.jpg

Surprise! We are moving back to Houston. This move came about fast and furious and voilà, the doors on the container are closed just like that. It’s amazing to think of our furniture, picture frames and recently bought, last-minute Dubai mementos in that generic container, hangin’ with countless other containers on a giant barge, out on the vast ocean. All of our belongings (minus 14 bags we are bringing to the airport – gulp) will meet us stateside in hopefully about two months.

The doors of the blog will close soon too. But I have a few posts left in me before saying goodbye, Dubai. More soon.

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The world from my window

The header of my blog is a detail of the house I used to see through my window when I would write.  It’s a beautiful and very unique villa that is across the street. Dubai loves its subdued tans, browns and beiges.  Colored tile and bright colors are not common, so I loved looking at that quirky and intricately decorated house on sunny afternoons and wonder about the people who live there. (Incidentally, my view is different now. Apparently Dubai can build the tallest skyscraper in the world and shape artificial islands into gigantic palm trees, but can’t connect wireless on both floors of the house we live in. At some point we moved the internet downstairs. So now when I work on the blog, I usually sit on my couch and look through the windows of my living room. My view now reminds me how powerless I am in stopping the never-ending sand from blanketing my patio and outdoor furniture in a seemingly permanent dusty film. I try to focus on the trees and flowers in our yard so I don’t think about how I should get out there and clean.)

I love the idea of taking pictures from windows at home, capturing scenes that might pass unnoticed unless you have a camera in hand.  I also like the idea of photographing a landmark in different types of light or weather.  I have lots of pictures of the mosque I see from my bedroom window.  Here’s one I took recently at dusk.

Dubai mosque

Here’s another from my bedroom window, but I took this super quickly and hopefully stealthily when the window was closed.  I prayed that the film on the outside of our windows that make it difficult to see inside was working really well because I didn’t want to distract the painter. I can’t think of a more dangerous pair of shoes to be wearing while balancing on  a wobbly plank of wood on the absolute highest part of the scaffolding with no safety equipment in sight. It was like watching a circus act from the comfort of my bed!  The other guy is standing on the little planter outside our window. Hope it’s made to support his weight!

photo (6)

This is a picture I took through my kitchen window with my mobile phone. It’s a typical Dubai scene: Something is broken. You call someone to fix it. A crew of 7 men show up, even when the problem is minor.  All but two men then sit around doing nothing.  These are those 5 men with nothing to do, making themselves at home in my backyard, while the other two tended to the problem.

Dubai maintenance men

Every single morning, no matter how hot, how sandy, how humid the weather, this man is washing our neighbor’s cars at 6:30 am sharp.  He’s usually the first thing I see when I take my first bleary-eyed peek out of the window.  I felt a bit like a cheap paparazzo when taking this quick snapshot, but I wanted to capture this scene from my bedroom window to remind me later how certain daily scenes in Dubai that may seem innocuous to a casual observer actually say a lot about the culture here.

DSC_0950-2

I’m certainly not the first to be interested in taking pictures from windows.  In fact, the first known photograph ever taken was through a window (and coincidentally it happens to be kept on the UT campus in Texas now). For more info about this photo, read this interesting post.

first photograph

First photograph, View from the Window at Le Gras, Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, ca. 1826 One of the most renowned items in the Ransom Center a the University of Texas

Some of my favorite photographers had entire projects based on photos taken from the window of their home.  Ruth Orkin (of American Girl in Italy fame) dedicated two books of photographs taken from her window. From her website:

Orkin lived in three New York City apartments during her lifetime; Horatio Street, 88th Street, and on Central Park West, and all of these locations appear throughout her work. She first photographed the children in her West Village neighborhood, and later found the vantage point from her 2nd floor window on88th Street interesting. However, it was the view from her Central Park West apartment that she would shoot for the next 30 years. These panoramic photographs of the changing seasons and the skyline became the subject for two books “A World Through My Window” (1978) and “More Pictures From My Window.” (1983) Orkin used to say that she chose the apartment, because the view was the closest thing to the orange groves and mountains of her childhood in Southern California.

Ruth Orkin, Man in Rain, New York City, 1952

Ruth Orkin, Man in Rain, New York City, 1952

Ruth Orkin, White Stoops, New York City, 1952

Ruth Orkin, White Stoops, New York City, 1952

Eugene Smith also took photographs from his New York apartment when compiling photos and sound recordings that became the Jazz Loft Project. From his 4th floor window on 6th Avenue, he snapped pictures at dawn of jazz musicians leaving after a night of playing and truck drivers delivering flowers in the nearby flower district.  When I think of my boring street I get a little envious of all the cool things that were happening outside of his window back in the 60s!

Eugene Smith, White Rose Sign, 1957

Eugene Smith, from The Jazz Loft Project

Eugene Smith, from The Jazz Loft Project

What’s your window to the world look like? I would love to see posts from other people showing your view, where you write or your neighborhood.  I’ll link it here if anyone wants to do it.  :)

Posted in Day-to-day living in Dubai | Tagged , , , , | 22 Comments