Granada

I first went to Granada around 14 years ago (Gulp! I’m getting old) to stay out too late and eat Kinder Buenos every day diligently study Spanish.  It was one city of several I visited during a trip I took as a young single gal after I saved all my pennies from my whopping salary of $26,000 a year.  Granada really impressed me.  The Arabic influence in architecture and daily life was fascinating and seemed so new and exciting.  I also met one of my best friends who is still like a sister to me. (Hi Chels!)  When it was time to go home, I was devastated.  8-5 job? Bills? REAL LIFE?  No thank you!  I cried and cried into my pillow.  I thought I would never return.

Little did I know I would see Granada’s lively plazas and mysterious, winding streets again.  I happened to marry someone whose family lives in the area.  I ended up going back with my husband and his sister, I took my parents and one of my sisters there, and now I’ve seen my children run along the very same streets that so enchanted me the first time around.  Isn’t it funny how you never know where life will lead you?  That road doesn’t always go to happy places, but luckily in this case, it did.

Here are a few pics from our last visit. Next time it’s back to the UAE where this blog belongs! :)

Granada albaicin street black and white

street in the Albaicin (the old Moorish quarter)

Granada architecture black and white

Plaza Nueva fountain Granada Spain

Plaza Nueva

Granada shopping Albaicin

Some of the items for sale in the little touristy shops in the Albaicin

orange trees Granada

The orange trees in southern Spain are like little happy faces smiling at you when winter skies are gray and overcast

Granada street view Spain

Granada outdoor cafe

One of the things I miss (a lot!) while living in Dubai: sitting at outdoor cafes and having a beer or glass of wine.

Granada crowded street

I love how crowded the streets become after siesta.

Granada Plaza Nueva

Teteria in Granada

“Teterias” (Morroccan-style tea houses) are popular in Granada

expect a variety of teas on the menu and try several!

expect a variety of teas on the menu and try several!

Granada arabic door albaicin

door in Albaicin

Sierra Nevada rooftops Granada Spain

Sierra Nevada and rooftops

View of Alhmabra from the Mirador de San Nicolas.  undoubtedly a touristy spot, but undoubtedly a jaw-dropping view

View of Alhambra from the Mirador de San Nicolas. Undoubtedly a touristy spot, but undoubtedly a jaw-dropping view

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About Lynda

Longhorns and Camels is a blog about exploring Dubai from the perspective of an expat from Texas. It features commentary about living in Dubai including descriptions of local culture and popular activities in the region. It also includes photography of the UAE and other countries abroad. It has been recommended by several well-known guides for expatriates: InterNations, ExpatWoman and Expat Focus.
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25 Responses to Granada

  1. joanfrankham says:

    Granada looks wonderful, a great place to make memories.

  2. Putting this on my list of places I would like to visit!

  3. Mitzie Mee says:

    Just realized that you probably been to Granada (14 years ago) at the same time as one of my friends was there for the same purpose (eating Kinder Bueno and studying Spanish:))

  4. In your pictures, I can see a lot of my city (Algiers), same architecture, narrow streets, front doors and many more. Thank you for sharing these lovely pictures. Granada, even the name has a musical consonance.

  5. Lovely pics. I loved Granada too, and ditto, went when I was quite impoverished, and earning far less than you! It’s become my raison d’etre, revisiting all these places now I am flush. But as you say, unfortunately now I have responsibilities too, and can’t go off with a gypsy on his motorbike…

    • Oh the motorbike comment is so funny! That made me smile. Yes, those days are certainly behind me. I love that you went there too in similar circumstances! It’s definitely a different experience now. Instead of wandering slowly, marveling at the quiet corners and wondering what people are doing behind some of those doors that look like they are hardly ever opened, I was mostly distracted by my kids, hoping they weren’t running too fast down the steep incline of the Albaicin. I could see a skinned knee in the my future – not quite the same experience if you know what I mean – haha. Anyway – I wouldn’t change any of it. :)

  6. safia says:

    I think it might be 16 years ago when I visited Granada and I also loved it. I remember the thickest drinking chocolate ever, and those little cigar-shaped pastries (churrizo?) for dunking as the locals did. Too many smokers in the cafes for me, though, but such a wonderful city – glad you picked out the Alhambra and the Sierra Nevada too – great photos.

  7. Diana says:

    Lyn….can you believe I have never been to Granada or Seville??? I need to get to those places…..anyway…..loved that pic of the orange tree! :)

  8. Laura says:

    Beautiful, love the tea and tea houses! I would love to visit Spain one of these days. I was in San Miguelle Allende last fall and the Spanish influence is so evident… I should post about it but I’ve been way too busy! Take care, L

  9. Amazing!!!! Your photos made me want to dream about Granada!

    Have you heard about the story of that passenger who wanted to go to Granada but was booked to go to Grenada in Caribbean instead? She only found out about the error when she was already inside the plane and she told the person next to her that she can’t wait to walk through Al Hambra. :p

    By the way, I sent you an email about another collab. I hope you will join again. :)

  10. I totally loved the photos of the Sierra Nevada! It was way too misty when I visited and was unable to get a good look at it! :D

  11. Dasa says:

    I’m a little bit ashamed but I had to look at the map to see exactly where in Spain Granada is located. Pictures are beautiful and they remind me of my country – Slovenia and all her small villages in the area of the Karst.

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